Catch Me if You Can, Starring Grayware

November 15, 2018

Take a glance at the most discussed cybersecurity topics of the week.

If a software program had an ability to introduce itself, you would probably read: “Nor white, nor black - somewhere between legitimate programs and harmful applications”. Well, nice to meet you (no), grayware. And again the target is children’s security.

Does a new generation cause new cybersecurity threats?

Information Age on November 13, 2018

They are already 18. They probably haven’t even heard about beepers; they didn’t choose cassettes or DVDs in video store rentals but they are professionals in swiping Instagram news feed or retweeting weird news. They are millennials.

It seems unbelievable but another characteristic of millennials’ is that they are a threat to cybersecurity. According to the research, as ‘technologically savvy’ millennials enter the workforce, the employees’ security skills become worse. Three-quarters of 1,600 respondents use the same passwords across both work and personal accounts in comparison with 56% who admitted to doing so in 2014.

However, the human’s error is not always the case. Another reason of threat exposure is the evolution and complication of the IT environment so that it is harder for employers to organize effective IT department workforce.

Grayware in Computerland – annoying and hardly detected hero

Dark Reading on November 11, 2018

If a software program had an ability to introduce itself, you would probably read: “Nor white, nor black – somewhere between legitimate programs and harmful applications”. Well, nice to meet you (no), grayware.

Actually, the grayware is closely connected with “potentially unwanted programs”. Antimalware protection systems can block grayware, but only after an organization defines something as unwanted. Dealing with more serious threats and obvious malware, IT department just may not pay enough attention to annoying pop-up ads, appearing on users’ desktops that, moreover, can track their Internet activity. What else can grayware do?

  1. Grayware can collect sensitive information. Furthermore, users almost always accept this activity, approving license agreement.
  2. It makes for more malicious noise and increases the total amount of data.
  3. This program can hide malware and fake applications. In addition to providing a hiding place for unwanted software, grayware may come in package with it. For instance, traveling on grayware’s coattails Trojans may masquerade as antivirus protection or browser helpers.
  4. Grayware can eat bandwidth.
  5. It also may mess browser functions. Browser attacks take two broad forms, either gathering unauthorized information or sending requests to unwanted destinations like malicious sites.

The only question is how to mitigate the influence of these “potentially unwanted programs”? Although they can be blocked by users’ actions, the first and essential step is to train employees to get applications from a legitimate vendor.

What time is it now? It’s hackers’ rush hour.

BBC News on November 15, 2018

And again the target is children’s security. Researchers found that a Chinese location-tracking smartwatch worn by thousands of children can be easily hacked.

The results of potential malicious actions are impressive. Attackers may change the assigned ID number and get a child’s personal information including his or her name, date of birth, photo, and parents’ phone numbers. Moreover, hackers can track the wearer’s current and past locations.

Although watches have already been banned for sales on several online marketplaces, researchers discovered about 14,000 pieces that are still active in use.

Contact us

NO SPAM.
WE RESPECT YOUR PRIVACY.
*Average response time is 6 hours
More on:
Admins (35) CISO (18) Defense (52) Error (21) Espionage (5) Fraud (10) Human error (17) IoT (16) IT leaders (22) Team (31) Technology (75) Threats (58)