Don’t Be Trapped – Close Cybersecurity Holes

March 14, 2019

Take a glance at the most discussed cybersecurity news of the week. Learn about the current cybersecurity holes in business applications and how to avoid them.

The air is filled with freshness, and bird songs are heard: Tweet! Tweet! Yeah, spring days are awesome. However, this news is focused on different tweets. If you thought that time management is a panacea of fussy businesspeople, we would convince you otherwise. Hacking is also a scheduled activity.

Tweet! The bird that is able to spot cybersecurity flaws

Wired on March 7, 2019

The air is filled with freshness, and birds are heard singing: Tweet! Tweet! Yeah, spring days are awesome. However, this news is focused on different tweets.

Twitter has long established itself as more than just a popular social networking platform. For different groups of professionals, it has become a powerful analytical tool, providing actual information on a range of trends and topics. Cybersecurity is no exception.

Last week a group of researchers published a paper, describing a new service that investigates millions of tweets for mentions of software security vulnerabilities. Then, an application, which is based on machine learning algorithms, predicts the possible impact of a discovered threat.

Moreover, researchers have found that Twitter can foresee most of security flaws before they appear in the National Vulnerability Database – the official register of security vulnerabilities tracked by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Cybercriminals turned to small businesses

Dark Reading on March 12, 2019

We were absolutely flabbergasted at facts covered in this news. Be ready to join our astonished community.

According to the “2019 Identity Breach Report”, published by the 4iQ company, the number of data breaches in 2018 increased by 424%, in comparison with the year prior. However, the average size of data leakage was 4.7 times smaller than in 2017 and reached nearly 216,884 records.

In fact, the tendency can be easily explained. While the EU’s GDPR heightened the rise of security awareness around the world, major companies have improved their information policies and implemented new data security tools to protect their businesses from the common cybersecurity holes. Unlike the giants of the market, small and midsize companies are not able to take the same measures due to the budget and HR restrictions.

In fact, nowadays the rise of cyber attacks is typical for almost all sectors. For instance, education industry is one of the prime targets for hackers.

Hackers’ timetable

Gov Info Security on March 13, 2019

If you thought that time management is a panacea of fussy businesspeople, we would convince you otherwise. Hacking is also a scheduled activity.

As reported by Redscan, malefactors prefer to hack organizations on Saturday than any other day, so that they have more time to explore the network before employees return to work on Monday. The research is based on information submitted by 181 organizations to the U.K. Information Commissioner’s Office.

What is interesting, companies also use some tricky tactics. In case of the data breach, they would publish data breach notification on Friday to minimize the negative publicity. Moreover, the average reporting time is 3 weeks, and only 25% of businesses comply with the GDPR 72-hour reporting requirement.

Thus, there is something to work on – ignoring cybersecurity holes can be really costly.

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