Cybersecurity Risks in Education Have Snowballed

April 2, 2019

Education Cybersecurity Weekly is a curated weekly news overview for those who are concerned about the Education industry and Education data breach. It provides brief summaries and links to articles and news across a spectrum of EdTech and current cybersecurity risks in education.

While technologies simplify our life and make interaction with the world fast and convenient, cars are being transformed to the 2-ton mobile computers on wheels that can be hacked. It seems, now it is a school buses’ turn. Although the choice of data storage solution depends on the university campus needs, assuring fast and easy data recovery should be a top priority for IT leaders and campus residents to mitigate cybersecurity risks in education.

Human error is the biggest vulnerability for educational institutions

EdScoop on April 1, 2019

When two industry leaders, EDUCAUSE and the Consortium for School Networking, named security as a top priority last year, building cybersecurity policy and minimizing cybersecurity risks in education became a matter of primary concern for IT experts. For instance, the University of Montana rebuilds its research network to improve security and ease of communication across campus.

In addition to organizations’ measures, government initiatives are vital in the national cybersecurity education. Not so long ago Georgia has approved K-8 computer science standards, so that students along with computer basics, will be focused on cybersecurity ethics, privacy laws and careers in computer science.

Once Thomas Carlyle, a Scottish writer, said: “The greatest mistake is to imagine that we never err.” Referring to cybersecurity, this statement certainly describes the human error nature.

Having a weak password, attaching sensitive data to an email, not using encryption, or accessing public Wi-Fi are all user-generated vulnerabilities that could threaten the cybersecurity of educational institutions.

Amelia Vance, Director of education privacy for the Future of Privacy Forum

Don’t forget to backup: three ways universities can store and secure data

EdTech Magazine on March 28, 2019

If you tried to compare the university’s database with the Solar system, there would be a range of planets and constellations, processing no less diverse information ranging from student and faculty data to intellectual property. Actually, several ways to store this data exist – flash storage systems, hybrid cloud models, and full-cloud integration. When it comes to backups realization, they have some distinctive features.

  • Flash storage eases the data backup process. However, sometimes it is difficult to find a fast and efficient storage system.
  • Hybrid cloud storage model offers multiple options for universities. After the Barracuda Backup 1091 server integration, Washburn University, in case of hackers’ attack, can easily restore university data in 5-10 minutes.
  • Cloud storage secures data and simplifies backup processes. For example, the University of Minnesota has moved all data to Google Cloud to minimize attacks on storage units.

Although the choice of data storage solution depends on the university campus needs, assuring fast and easy data recovery should be a top priority for IT leaders and campus residents to mitigate cybersecurity risks in education.

Driverless school buses. Want a ride?

The Tech Edvocate on March 28, 2019

While technologies simplify our life and make interaction with the world fast and convenient, cars are being transformed to the 2-ton mobile computers on wheels that can be hacked. It seems, now it is a school buses’ turn.

Indeed, self-driving buses have complicated systems, including several types of sensors, cameras, radar and lidar to create a map of their surroundings. Then this data is transferred to ML-based software that is programmed with the road-safety rules and obstacle avoidance algorithms to ensure safe driving.

However, the idea of driverless school buses is not popular among Americans. According to Pew survey, more than half of respondents expressed concern rather than enthusiasm about the advent of this technology. Moreover, in terms of hackers’ ingenuity, self-driving buses may be added to cybersecurity risks in education.



Bobby the Fish

Now it’s time for Bobby the Shark!

Fish morning, ladies and gentlemen.

Every fish knows a legend telling about Richard the Magnificent, the forefather of catfishes and the biggest catfish ever.

Fish experts say that if you eat a lot, you will reach its size. Unfortunately, this will never happen to me, because my man Anthony keeps me fit and always says “human error is the only vulnerability when it comes to cybersecurity risks in education”. Sounds strange.

Self-confidence is important. Sometimes I see a frightening and handsome shark in the mirror. Why cannot this terrible Anthony’s cat see the same?

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