The Formula Of Campus Network Security

January 22, 2019

Education Cybersecurity Weekly is a curated weekly news overview for those who are concerned about the Education industry. It provides brief summaries and links to articles and news across a spectrum of cybersecurity and technology topics that are specific to the industry.

If hackers played darts in the office, the dartboard on the inside of the door would be called “universities’ data”. While new GDPR rules strictly fine organizations if they do not take adequate steps to secure their systems, IT departments are trying to build an effective security policy for their institutions.

The analytics-driven security platforms to fight against cyber threats on campuses

EdScoop on January 21, 2019

If hackers played darts in the office, the dartboard on the inside of the door would be called “universities’ data”.

Storing tremendous amount of personal data and annually connecting thousands of new devices, the campus network system is a matter of IT team’s concern. However, according to a recent study, the analytics-driven security platforms may become a solution in reducing exposure to cyber threats. The platform of this type, monitoring and analyzing data from several sources, can improve following cybersecurity measures:

  1. Collection of basic security logs and other machine data of the organization
  2. Applying a standard security taxonomy for asset and identity data
  3. Advanced attack detection through collecting additional sources like endpoint activity and network metadata
  4. Updating the security data by augmenting it with intelligence sources
  5. Establishing consistent capabilities via automation of the security operations

And something more on campus network security – how to mitigate IoT risk

EdTech Magazine on January 15, 2019

30 billion is a number of the autonomous IoT devices that are expected to be on the University of Kansas network in two short years.

While the phrase “IoT risks” sounds like a commonplace and insistently appears in your news feed, security experts discuss the question of how we use the data coming from IoT to make decisions properly.

To solve this problem, IT administrators of the Montana State University implemented the intent-based networking to better understand the students’ intentions on the network and to precisely determine an access request that seems out of place.

Another tip for IT teams to minimize IoT cyber threats is to be the ones to install the IoT devices across the campus. The experience of the Virginia Commonwealth University showed the effectiveness of this measure in strengthening the campus network security.

Network minus cyber threats equals e-safety

Education Technology on January 20, 2019

In the last year every third of the educational institutions in the UK fell victim to some form of cybercrime. More than one in ten schools had their passwords cracked by outside attacker or suffered a successful social engineering attack. While new GDPR rules strictly fine organizations if they do not take adequate steps to secure their systems, IT departments are trying to build an effective security policy for their institutions. Thus, these tips would be useful:

  • Establish solid access control policies and constantly update content filters to reduce the risk of deliberate attacks and accidental breaches. Some tech-savvy students are able to overcome all protection mechanisms.
  • Check third-party providers thoroughly and ensure their approach to cybersecurity is matching the law requirements.
  • Ensure secure configuration and patch management – the security patches should be implemented timely and all configuration changes need to be authorized.
  • Monitoring and incident management – schools’ systems must be continuously monitored and in case of criminal incidents, the relevant authorities must be aware.
  • Invest in cybersecurity and online safety education – the UK Department for Education requires that students are taught about online safety as part of safeguarding activities.
  • Don’t forget physical security and consider personal devices.

Students are challenged to construct a drone to save endangered animals

Education Technology on January 22, 2019

This is the way how it should be. The Youth Innovation competition initiated by the British International Education Association (BIEA) focuses on fighting extinction and illustrates a role technology should play in the education process.

The initiative challenges 9-17 aged children to design and develop a drone to protect vulnerable animal species. What is noteworthy, the competition emphasizes the ethical implication of technology, referring not only to humans, but to the animal welfare.

The ethical issue of the technology development is especially actual, in terms of the recent Gatwick incident, where drones flew near the runway and triggered a full shutdown of the airport.

Yes, there are negative things happening with drones, and I want the kids to find out about them. The competition stipulates that you need to look at both the disadvantages and the advantages, and convince the judges that your idea is an ethically sound one.

Dr Alex Holmes, competition designer and host of the BIEA STEM conference

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